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Influence of KMnO4 Concentration on Infrared Emissivity of Coatings

On TC4 Alloys by Micro-Arc Oxidation (Materials EISSN 1996-1944)

Abstract:

Figure 8. Infrared emissivity curves of the MAO ceramic coatings with different KMnO4 concentrations within a waveband of 5–20 μm.

Figure 8. Infrared emissivity curves of the MAO ceramic coatings with different KMnO4 concentrations within a waveband of 5–20 μm.

Ceramic coatings with high emissivity were fabricated on TC4 alloys by micro-arc oxidation technique (MAO) in mixed silicate and phosphate electrolytes with varying KMnO4 addition.

The microstructure, phase and chemical composition were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the infrared emissivity of the MAO coatings was measured in a waveband of 5–20 μm.

The results show that the thickness of the coatings increased with the addition of KMnO4, but the roughness of the coatings first decreased and then increased slightly due to the inhibitory effect of KMnO4 on Na2SiO3 deposition. Read More

Ultra-thin perfect absorber employing a tunable phase change material

New device hides, on cue, from infrared cameras

November 26, 2012

Tunable material developed at Harvard boasts nearly 100% absorption on demand

Cambridge, Mass. – November 26, 2012 – Now you see it, now you don’t.

A new device invented at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) can absorb 99.75% of infrared light that shines on it. When activated, it appears black to infrared cameras.

Composed of just a 180-nanometer-thick layer of vanadium dioxide (VO2) on top of a sheet of sapphire, the device reacts to temperature changes by reflecting dramatically more or less infrared light.

Announced today in the journal Applied Physics Letters, and featured on its cover, this perfect absorber is ultrathin, tunable, and exceptionally well suited for use in a range of infrared optical devices.

Perfect absorbers have been created many times before, but not with such versatile properties. In a Fabry-Pérot cavity, for instance, two mirrors sandwich an absorbing material, and light simply reflects light back and forth until it’s mostly all gone. Other devices incorporate surfaces with nanoscale metallic patterns that trap and eventually absorb the light.
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Fluke Calibrator Video

Emissivity makes a temperature difference for infrared thermometers.

In the YouTube video below, Frank Liebman, an engineer with Fluke Corporation’s Hart Scientific Division demonstrates the impact that surface emissivity has on temperature measurement and temperature calibration using a modified Fluke blackbody calibrator and Fluke Thermal Imager.

We were surprised to see that no one commented on this video, despite an ending that leaves one hanging, at least us, with the obvious question: How do you do a radiometric calibration of a surface of unknown emissivity using a Fluke Blackbody Calibrator?

Do you have any ideas?